Топ-100 ⓘ Free online encyclopedia. Did you know? page 371

ⓘ Free online encyclopedia. Did you know? page 371

                                               

Exposure suit

An exposure suit, or anti-exposure suit is clothing intended to protect the wearer from an extreme environment. Depending on the environment and specific use the suit may be required to provide thermal insulation, buoyancy, and or complete isolat ...

                                               

Fashion accessory

A fashion accessory is an item used to contribute, in a secondary manner, to the wearers outfit, often used to complete an outfit and chosen to specifically complement the wearers look. It has the capacity to further express an individuals identi ...

                                               

Form-fitting garment

A form-fitting garment is an article of clothing that tightly follows the contours of the part of the body being covered. A feature of Western societies is the popularity of form-fitting clothing worn by women, compared to equivalent male garment ...

                                               

Fouta towel

The fouta is a piece of thin patterned cotton or linen fabric of Tunisian origin used in many Mediterranean countries and Yemen. Among other uses, they were worn, by both men and women, wrapped around the body while at the public baths in 19th-ce ...

                                               

French maid

French maid is a strongly modified style of servants dress that evolved from typical housemaids black-and-white afternoon uniforms of 19th-century France. Some styles are conservative while others are revealing. The French maid costume is often u ...

                                               

Global trade of secondhand clothing

The global trade of secondhand clothing has a long history. Until the mid 19th century, second hand clothing was an important way of acquiring clothing. Only through industrialization, mass production, and increasing income, was the general publi ...

                                               

Godet (sewing)

A godet is an extra piece of fabric in the shape of a circular sector which is set into a garment, usually a dress or skirt. The addition of a godet causes the article of clothing in question to flare, thus adding width and volume. The most popul ...

                                               

Hypercolor

Hypercolor was a line of clothing, mainly T-shirts and shorts, that changed color with heat. They were manufactured by Generra Sportswear Company of Seattle and marketed in the United States as Generra Hypercolor or Generra Hypergrafix and elsewh ...

                                               

Lint (material)

Lint is the common name for visible accumulations of textile fibers and other materials, usually found on and around clothing. Certain materials used in the manufacture of clothing, such as cotton, linen, and wool, contain numerous, very short fi ...

                                               

One size fits all

One size fits all is a description for a product that would fit in all instances. The term has been extended to mean one style or procedure would fit in all related applications. It is an alternative for "Not everyone fits the mold ". It has been ...

                                               

Ready-made garment

Ready-made garments are mass-produced finished textile products of the clothing industry. They are not custom tailored according to measurements, but rather generalized according to anthropometric studies. They are made from many different fabric ...

                                               

Reversible garment

A reversible garment is a garment that can be worn two ways. There is no true "inside out" to a reversible garment, since either way, it gives a fashionable appearance. Garments that are commonly made reversible include hats, jackets, vests, swea ...

                                               

Right to clothing

The right to adequate clothing, or the right to clothing, is recognized as a human right in various international human rights instruments; this, together with the right to food and the right to housing, are parts of the right to an adequate stan ...

                                               

Robe of honour

A robe of honour was a term designating rich garments given by medieval and early modern Islamic rulers to subjects as tokens of honour, often as part of a ceremony of appointment to a public post, or as a token of confirmation or acceptance of v ...

                                               

See-through clothing

See-through clothing is any garment of clothing made with lace, mesh or sheer fabric that allows the wearers body or undergarments to be seen through its fabric. See-through fabrics were fashionable in Europe in the eighteenth century. There was ...

                                               

Semiotics of dress

The semiotics of dress is a term used to refer to the design and customs associated with dress, as patterned to a kind of symbolism that has rules and norms. It is the study of how people use clothing and adornments to signify various cultural an ...

                                               

Spray-on clothing

Spray-on clothing is a form of clothing, that is applied by spraying polymer over the body in such a manner that it appears as clothing. It is a polymer mix that dries relatively quickly. On September 15, 2010, Ian Sample, The Guardian s Science ...

                                               

Transvestism

Transvestism is the practice of dressing in a style or manner traditionally associated with the opposite sex. In some cultures, transvestism is practiced for religious, traditional, or ceremonial reasons.

                                               

Waistband

A waistband is a strip of material that is either elastic or some other confining fabric that encircles the waist. The waist band can be used to limit expansion of the stomach to meet various objectives including to help prevent overeating, to en ...

                                               

Wardrobe (clothing)

In the performing arts, the wardrobe is the actors costumes, shoes, undergarments, hats and costume related personal props such as gloves, jewelry, parasols, fans and pocket books. The name wardrobe is a metonym for the contents of a wardrobe. In ...

                                               

Black Swan dance double controversy

The Black Swan dance double controversy concerns an American film and the credit its production gave to performers. Black Swan is a 2010 American psychological thriller film about a ballet dancer directed by Darren Aronofsky and starring Natalie ...

                                               

Destruction of cultural heritage by ISIL

Deliberate destruction and theft of cultural heritage has been conducted by the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant since 2014 in Iraq, Syria, and to a lesser extent in Libya. The destruction targets various places of worship under ISIL control ...

                                               

Double Fold

Double Fold: Libraries and the Assault on Paper is a non-fiction book by Nicholson Baker that was published in April 2001. An excerpt appeared in the July 24, 2000 issue of The New Yorker, under the title "Deadline: The Authors Desperate Bid to S ...

                                               

Incel

Incels, a portmanteau of involuntary celibates ", are members of an online subculture who define themselves as unable to find a romantic or sexual partner despite desiring one, a state they describe as inceldom. Discussions in incel forums are of ...

                                               

Macedonia (terminology)

The name Macedonia is used in a number of competing or overlapping meanings to describe geographical, political and historical areas, languages and peoples in a part of south-eastern Europe. It has been a major source of political controversy sin ...

                                               

Murder of Shelby Tracy Tom

Shelby Tracy Tom was a Canadian transgender woman who was strangled to death in North Vancouver, British Columbia after 29 year old Jatin Patel discovered that Tom was transgender during a sexual encounter.

                                               

Oi!

Oi! is a subgenre of punk rock that originated in the United Kingdom in the late 1970s. The music and its associated subculture had the goal of bringing together punks, skinheads, and other disaffected working-class youth. The movement was partly ...

                                               

Poussinists and Rubenists

In 1671 an argument broke out in the French Royal Academy of Painting and Sculpture in Paris about whether drawing or color was more important in painting. On one side stood the Poussinists who were a group of French artists, named after the pain ...

                                               

Quarrel of the Ancients and the Moderns

The quarrel of the Ancients and the Moderns began overtly as a literary and artistic debate that heated up in the early 17th century and shook the Academie française.

                                               

The Triple Package

The Triple Package: How Three Unlikely Traits Explain the Rise and Fall of Cultural Groups in America is a book published in 2014 by two professors at Yale Law School, Amy Chua and her husband, Jed Rubenfeld. Amy Chua is also the author of the 20 ...

                                               

Vanitas: Flesh Dress for an Albino Anorectic

Vanitas: Flesh Dress for an Albino Anorectic is an artwork created by Canadian Jana Sterbak, first displayed at Montreals Galerie Rene Blouin. Its most famous showing was at the National Gallery of Canada in Ottawa, where it attracted national co ...

                                               

Voice of Fire

Voice of Fire is an acrylic on canvas abstract painting made by American painter Barnett Newman in 1967. It consists of three equally sized vertical stripes, with the outer two painted blue and the centre painted red. The work was created as a sp ...

                                               

Barbarian

A barbarian is a human who is perceived to be either uncivilized or primitive. The designation is usually applied as a generalization based on a popular stereotype; barbarians can be members of any nation judged by some to be less civilized or or ...

                                               

Black Girl Magic

Black Girl Magic is a movement that was popularized by CaShawn Thompson in 2013. The concept was born as a way to "celebrate the beauty, power and resilience of Black women", as described by Julee Wilson from HuffPost, and to congratulate Black w ...

                                               

Caledonian Antisyzygy

The term Caledonian Antisyzygy refers to the "idea of dueling polarities within one entity", thought of as typical for the Scottish psyche and literature. The term, which is derived from the Greek word zygon and syzygy, specifically refers to the ...

                                               

Carefree Black Girls

Carefree Black Girls is a cultural concept and movement that aims to increase the breadth of" alternative” representations of black women. The origins of this expression can be traced to both Twitter and Tumblr. Zeba Blay was reportedly the first ...

                                               

Cultural mulatto

The cultural mulatto is a concept introduced by Trey Ellis in his 1989 essay "The New Black Aesthetic". While the term "mulatto" typically refers to a person of mixed black and white ancestry, a cultural mulatto is defined by Ellis as a black per ...

                                               

Eastern world

Eastern world is an umbrella term for various cultures or social structures, nations and philosophical systems, which vary depending on the context. It most often includes at least part of Asia or, geographically, the countries and cultures east ...

                                               

Manic Pixie Dream Girl

Manic Pixie Dream Girl is a stock character type in films. Film critic Nathan Rabin, who coined the term after observing Kirsten Dunsts character in Elizabethtown, said that the MPDG "exists solely in the fevered imaginations of sensitive writer- ...

                                               

Missionary kid

Missionary kids are the children of missionary parents, and thus born and/or raised abroad. They form a subset of third culture kids. The term is more specifically applied when these children return to their "home" or passport country, and often ...

                                               

New Sincerity

New Sincerity is a trend in music, aesthetics, literary fiction, film criticism, poetry, literary criticism and philosophy that generally describes creative works that expand upon and break away from concepts of postmodernist irony and cynicism. ...

                                               

Noble savage

A noble savage is a literary stock character who embodies the concept of the indigene, outsider, wild human, an "other" who has not been "corrupted" by civilization, and therefore symbolizes humanitys innate goodness. Besides appearing in many wo ...

                                               

Plural society

A plural society is defined by Fredrik Barth as a society combining ethnic contrasts: the economic interdependence of those groups, and their ecological specialization. The ecological interdependence, or the lack of competition, between ethnic gr ...

                                               

Repugnancy costs

Repugnancy costs are costs borne by an individual or entity as a result of a stimulus that goes against that individual or entitys cultural mores. The cost could be emotional, physical, mental or figurative. The stimulus could be anything from fo ...

                                               

Salad bowl (cultural idea)

The salad bowl concept suggests that the integration of the many different cultures of United States residents combine like a salad, as opposed to the more traditional notion of a cultural melting pot. New York City can be considered as being a " ...

                                               

Vulgarity

Vulgarity is the quality of being common, coarse, or unrefined. This judgement may refer to language, visual art, social class, or social climbers. John Bayley claims the term can never be self-referential, because to be aware of vulgarity is to ...

                                               

Western world

The Western world, also known as the West, refers to various regions, nations and states, depending on the context, most often including at least parts of Europe, Australasia, and the Americas. There are many accepted definitions, all closely int ...

                                               

Cultural critic

A cultural critic is a critic of a given culture, usually as a whole. Cultural criticism has significant overlap with social and cultural theory. While such criticism is simply part of the self-consciousness of the culture, the social positions o ...

                                               

Dries van Agt

Andreas Antonius Maria "Dries" van Agt ; born 2 February 1931) is a retired Dutch politician and diplomat of the defunct Catholic Peoples Party and later the Christian Democratic Appeal party and jurist who served as Prime Minister of the Netherl ...

                                               

Jaafar Aksikas

Jaafar Aksikas is a Moroccan-born American academic, activist, media personality and cultural critic. He holds a Ph.D in Cultural Studies from George Mason University, an MA in the Humanities from Al Akhawayn University, Morocco, and a B.A. in En ...

                                               

Tariq Ali

Tariq Ali Khan is a British political activist, writer, journalist, historian, filmmaker, and public intellectual. He is a member of the editorial committee of the New Left Review and Sin Permiso, and contributes to The Guardian, CounterPunch, an ...

                                               

Hannah Arendt

Johanna "Hannah" Cohn Arendt, also known as Hannah Arendt Bluecher, was a German-American philosopher and political theorist. Her many books and articles on topics ranging from totalitarianism to epistemology have had a lasting influence on polit ...

                                               

Aristotle

Aristotle was a Greek philosopher and polymath during the Classical period in Ancient Greece. He was the founder of the Lyceum and the Peripatetic school of philosophy and Aristotelian tradition. Along with his teacher Plato, he has been called t ...

                                               

David Attenborough

Sir David Frederick Attenborough is an English broadcaster and natural historian. He is best known for writing and presenting, in conjunction with the BBC Natural History Unit, the nine natural history documentary series forming the Life collecti ...

                                               

Armen Avanessian

Armen Avanessian is an Austrian philosopher, literary theorist, and political theorist. He has taught at the Free University of Berlin, among other institutions, and held fellowships in the German departments of Columbia University and Yale Unive ...

                                               

Hiroki Azuma

Born in Mitaka, Tokyo.Takeo Onishi,a hydrologist, was one of his classmates when he was in the high school student. He received his Ph.D. in "Culture and Representation" from the University of Tokyo in 1999 and became a professor at the Internati ...

                                               

Stephen Bayley

Stephen Paul Bayley Hon FRIBA is a British author, critic, columnist, consultant, broadcaster, debater and curator. In the 1970s he was a lecturer in the history of art at the University of Kent, but first became prominent as an authority on styl ...

                                               

Simone de Beauvoir

Simone Lucie Ernestine Marie Bertrand de Beauvoir ; 9 January 1908 – 14 April 1986) was a French writer, intellectual, existentialist philosopher, political activist, feminist and social theorist. Though she did not consider herself a philosopher ...

                                               

Ruth Ben-Ghiat

Born in the US to an Israel-born Sephardi father and a Scottish mother, she grew up in Pacific Palisades, California. She graduated in History at UCLA and obtained a PhD in comparative history at Brandeis University. A member of the American Hist ...

                                               

Jeremy Bentham

Jeremy Bentham was an English philosopher, jurist, and social reformer regarded as the founder of modern utilitarianism. Bentham defined as the "fundamental axiom" of his philosophy the principle that "it is the greatest happiness of the greatest ...

                                               

Gautam Bhatia

Gautam Bhatia is a Delhi-based architect, writer and artist. A recipient of several awards for his buildings, he has also published books on architecture and satire. His drawings and sculptures have been displayed in galleries in India and abroad ...

                                               

Frankie Boyle

Francis Martin Patrick Boyle is a Scottish comedian and writer. He is known for his cynical and often controversial sense of humour. Boyle first gained recognition as a permanent panellist on the comedy show Mock the Week from its beginning in Ju ...

                                               

Will Brooker

Will Brooker is a writer and academic, professor of film and cultural studies at Kingston University and an author of several books of cultural studies dealing with elements of modern pop culture and fandom, specifically Batman, Star Wars and Ali ...

                                               

Wendy Brown (political theorist)

Wendy L. Brown is an American political theorist. She is Class of 1936 First Professor of Political Science and a core faculty member in The Program for Critical Theory at the University of California, Berkeley.

                                               

Martin Buber

Martin Buber was an Austrian, Palestinian Jewish and Israeli philosopher best known for his philosophy of dialogue, a form of existentialism centered on the distinction between the I–Thou relationship and the I–It relationship. Born in Vienna, Bu ...

                                               

George Carlin

George Denis Patrick Carlin was an American stand-up comedian, actor, author, and social critic. He was known for his black comedy and reflections on politics, the English language, psychology, religion, and various taboo subjects. He and his "se ...

                                               

Ellis Cashmore

Ellis Cashmore is a British sociologist and cultural critic. He is currently a visiting professor of sociology at Aston. Before teaching at Aston, he used to teach culture, media and sport at Staffordshire University, starting in 1993. Before 199 ...

                                               

Sebastian Castellio

Sebastian Castellio was a French preacher and theologian; and one of the first Reformed Christian proponents of religious toleration, freedom of conscience and thought.

                                               

Confucius

Confucius was a Chinese philosopher and politician of the Spring and Autumn period. The philosophy of Confucius, also known as Confucianism, emphasized personal and governmental morality, correctness of social relationships, justice, kindness, an ...

                                               

Carolyn Cooper

Carolyn Cooper CD is a West Indian author and literary scholar. Born in Jamaica, she is a professor of Literary and Cultural Studies at the University of the West Indies, Mona, Jamaica. From 1975 to 1980, she was an assistant professor at Atlanti ...

                                               

William Davies (political writer)

William Davies is an English writer, political and sociological theorist. His work focuses on the issues of consumerism, happiness, and the history and function of expertise on society. Davies has written for a variety of newspapers and periodica ...

                                               

T. J. Demos

T.J. Demos is an art historian and cultural critic who writes on contemporary art and visual culture, particularly in relation to globalization, politics, migration and ecology. Currently a Professor in the Department of History of Art and Visual ...

                                               

Jacques Derrida

Jacques Derrida was an Algerian-born French philosopher best known for developing a form of semiotic analysis known as deconstruction, which he discussed in numerous texts, and developed in the context of phenomenology. He is one of the major fig ...

                                               

John Dewey

John Dewey was an American philosopher, psychologist, and educational reformer whose ideas have been influential in education and social reform. He is regarded as one of the most prominent American scholars in the first half of the twentieth cent ...

                                               

Philip K. Dick

Philip Kindred Dick was an American writer known for his work in science fiction. He produced 44 published novels and approximately 121 short stories, most of which appeared in science fiction magazines during his lifetime. His fiction explored v ...

                                               

Diedrich Diederichsen

Diedrich Diederichsen is a German author, music journalist and cultural critic. He is one of Germany′s most renowned intellectual writers at the crossroads of the arts, politics, and pop culture. Diedrich Diederichsen was born and grew up in Hamb ...

                                               

Diogenes

Diogenes, also known as Diogenes the Cynic, was a Greek philosopher and one of the founders of Cynic philosophy. He was born in Sinope, an Ionian colony on the Black Sea, in 412 or 404 BC and died at Corinth in 323 BC. Diogenes was a controversia ...

                                               

Umberto Eco

Umberto Eco was an Italian novelist, literary critic, philosopher, semiotician, and university professor. He is widely known for his 1980 novel Il nome della rosa, a historical mystery combining semiotics in fiction with biblical analysis, mediev ...

                                               

Sanal Edamaruku

Sanal Edamaruku is an Indian author and rationalist. He is the founder-president and editor of Rationalist International, the president of the Indian Rationalist Association and the author of 25 books and other articles. In 2012, he was charged b ...

                                               

Epicurus

Epicurus was an ancient Greek philosopher and sage who founded Epicureanism, a highly influential school of philosophy. He was born on the Greek island of Samos to Athenian parents. Influenced by Democritus, Aristippus, Pyrrho, and possibly the C ...

                                               

Marielle Franco

Marielle Franco was a Brazilian politician, feminist, and human rights activist. After earning a masters degree in public administration from the Fluminense Federal University, she served as a city councillor of the Municipal Chamber of Rio de Ja ...

                                               

Francis Fukuyama

Yoshihiro Francis Fukuyama is an American political scientist, political economist, and writer. Fukuyama is known for his book The End of History and the Last Man, which argued that the worldwide spread of liberal democracies and free-market capi ...

                                               

Alexander Genis

Alexander Genis is a Russian–American writer, broadcaster, and cultural critic. He has written more than a dozen books that are non-fiction bestsellers in Russia. Genis, an American citizen, resides in the New York City area. He is the father of ...

                                               

Ricky Gervais

Ricky Dene Gervais is an English comedian, actor, writer, and director. He is perhaps best known for co-creating, writing, and acting in the British television series The Office. He has won seven BAFTA Awards, five British Comedy Awards, two Emmy ...

                                               

William Gibson

William Ford Gibson is an American-Canadian speculative fiction writer and essayist widely credited with pioneering the science fiction subgenre known as cyberpunk. Beginning his writing career in the late 1970s, his early works were noir, near-f ...

                                               

Theo van Gogh (film director)

Theodoor Theo van Gogh was a Dutch director and film and television producer, actor and author. He directed "Submission: Part 1", a short film written by Somali writer and political Ayaan Hirsi Ali, which criticized the treatment of women in Isla ...

                                               

John Gray (philosopher)

John Nicholas Gray is an English political philosopher with interests in analytic philosophy and the history of ideas. He retired in 2008 as School Professor of European Thought at the London School of Economics and Political Science. Gray contri ...

                                               

A. C. Grayling

Anthony Clifford Grayling, commonly known as A. C. Grayling, is a British philosopher and author. He was born in Northern Rhodesia and spent most of his childhood there and in Malawi. In 2011 he founded and became the first Master of New College ...

                                               

Margaret Morganroth Gullette

Margaret Morganroth Gullette, a Resident Scholar at the Womens Studies Research Center at Brandeis University, is a cultural critic who calls herself an age critic and theorist. She is a prize-winning writer of nonfiction, an essayist, feminist, ...

                                               

Jurgen Habermas

Jurgen Habermas is a German philosopher and sociologist in the tradition of critical theory and pragmatism. His work addresses communicative rationality and the public sphere. Associated with the Frankfurt School, Habermass work focuses on the fo ...

                                               

Gia M. Hamilton

Hamilton was born in New Orleans, Louisiana. Her father is a retired nuclear engineer. Hamilton received a bachelors degree in cultural anthropology from New York University and a Masters of applied anthropology from City University of New York.

                                               

Kate Harding

Kate Harding is a feminist and fat-acceptance writer. She was founding editor of the Shapely Prose blog, author of Asking For It: The Alarming Rise of Rape Culture - and What We Can Do About It, co-author of Lessons From the Fat-o-Sphere: Quit Di ...

                                               

Sam Harris

Samuel Benjamin Harris is an American author, philosopher, neuroscientist, and podcast host. His work touches on a wide range of topics, including rationality, religion, ethics, free will, neuroscience, meditation, philosophy of mind, politics, t ...

                                               

Christopher Hitchens

Christopher Eric Hitchens was an English-American author, columnist, essayist, orator, journalist, and social critic. Hitchens was the author, co-author, editor, or co-editor of over 30 books, including five collections of essays on culture, poli ...

                                               

Jim Jefferies (comedian)

Geoff James Nugent, known professionally as Jim Jefferies, is an Australian-American stand-up comedian, actor, and writer. He created and starred in the American FX sitcom Legit and the Comedy Central late-night show The Jim Jefferies Show.

                                               

Adrian Johnston (philosopher)

Adrian Johnston is an American philosopher. He is a Professor in the Department of Philosophy at the University of New Mexico at Albuquerque and a faculty member at the Emory Psychoanalytic Institute in Atlanta.

                                               

Nader Kadhim

Born in the village of Al Dair in 1973, Kadhim completed his primary, intermediate and secondary education in government schools. He then enrolled in University of Bahrain where he earned a B.A. in Arabic language and literature in 1995 and Maste ...

                                               

Wojciech Karpinski

Wojciech Karpinski was born 11 May 1943 in Poland, as a son to the architect Zbigniew Karpinski and grandson to Wojciech Zatwarnicki 1874–1948, who during World War II operated a HeHalutz farm on his estate in the Warsaw district of Czerniakow, s ...

                                               

Søren Kierkegaard

Søren Aabye Kierkegaard, 5 May 1813 – 11 November 1855) was a Danish philosopher, theologian, poet, social critic and religious author who is widely considered to be the first existentialist philosopher. He wrote critical texts on organized relig ...

                                               

Iain King

Iain Benjamin King is a British writer. King was appointed a Commander of the Order of the British Empire in the 2013 Birthday Honours, for services to governance in Libya, Afghanistan and Kosovo. He is a former Fellow of Cambridge University, an ...

This website uses cookies. Cookies remember you so we can give you a better online experience.
preloader close
preloader