Топ-100 ⓘ Free online encyclopedia. Did you know? page 96

ⓘ Free online encyclopedia. Did you know? page 96

                                               

Earth

Earth is the third planet from the Sun and the only astronomical object known to harbor life. According to radiometric dating and other evidence, Earth formed over 4.5 billion years ago. Earths gravity interacts with other objects in space, espec ...

                                               

Mars

Mars is the fourth planet from the Sun and the second-smallest planet in the Solar System after Mercury. In English, Mars carries a name of the Roman god of war and is often referred to as the Red Planet. The latter refers to the effect of the ir ...

                                               

Neptune

Neptune is the eighth and farthest known planet from the Sun in the Solar System. In the Solar System, it is the fourth-largest planet by diameter, the third-most-massive planet, and the densest giant planet. Neptune is 17 times the mass of Earth ...

                                               

Pluto

Pluto is an icy dwarf planet in the Kuiper belt, a ring of bodies beyond the orbit of Neptune. It was the first Kuiper belt object to be discovered and is the largest known dwarf planet. Pluto was discovered by Clyde Tombaugh in 1930 as the ninth ...

                                               

Saturn

Saturn is the sixth planet from the Sun and the second-largest in the Solar System, after Jupiter. It is a gas giant with an average radius of about nine times that of Earth. It only has one-eighth the average density of Earth; however, with its ...

                                               

Comet

A comet is an icy, small Solar System body that, when passing close to the Sun, warms and begins to release gases, a process called outgassing. This produces a visible atmosphere or coma, and sometimes also a tail. These phenomena are due to the ...

                                               

Exocomet

An exocomet, or extrasolar comet, is a comet outside the Solar System, which includes rogue comets and comets that orbit stars other than the Sun. The first exocomets were detected in 1987 around Beta Pictoris, a very young A-type main-sequence s ...

                                               

Lost comet

A lost comet is one which was not detected during its most recent perihelion passage. This generally happens when data is insufficient to reliably calculate the comets location or if the solar elongation is unfavorable near perihelion passage. Th ...

                                               

Main-belt comet

Active asteroids are small solar system bodies that have asteroid-like orbits but show comet-like visual characteristics. That is, they show comae, tails, or other visual evidence of mass-loss, but their orbit remains within Jupiters orbit. These ...

                                               

Antimatter comet

Antimatter comets are hypothetical comets composed solely of antimatter instead of ordinary matter. Although never actually observed, and unlikely to exist anywhere within the Milky Way, they have been hypothesized to exist, and their existence, ...

                                               

Comet Encke

Comet Encke or Enckes Comet is a periodic comet that completes an orbit of the Sun once every 3.3 years. Encke was first recorded by Pierre Mechain in 1786, but it was not recognized as a periodic comet until 1819 when its orbit was computed by J ...

                                               

Comet Humason

There is another long-period comet named Humason: C/1960 M1 a.k.a. 1959 X, 1960e. Comet Humason, formally designated C/1961 R1, was a non-periodic comet discovered by Milton L. Humason on September 1, 1961. Its perihelion was well beyond the orbi ...

                                               

24P/Schaumasse

By the end of 1912 it was recognised as a short period comet estimated to return in 7.1 years, later recalculated as 8 years. The 1919 return was recovered by Gaston Fayet Paris, France as magnitude 10.5. The 1927 approach was magnitude 12, but t ...

                                               

45P/Honda–Mrkos–Pajdusakova

45P/Honda–Mrkos–Pajdusakova is a short-period comet discovered by Minoru Honda December 3, 1948. It is named after Minoru Honda, Antonin Mrkos, and Ľudmila Pajdusakova. The object revolves around the Sun on an elliptical orbit with a period of 5. ...

                                               

36P/Whipple

36P/Whipple is a periodic comet in the Solar System. It is the lowest numbered Quasi-Hilda comet. The comet nucleus is estimated to be 4.5 kilometers in diameter.

                                               

51P/Harrington

51P/Harrington is a periodic comet in the Solar System. It was discovered by Robert George Harrington at Palomar Observatory on 14 August 1953 using the Schmidt telescope. It then had a brightness of magnitude 15. In October 1956 its orbit was af ...

                                               

52P/Harrington–Abell

52P/Harrington–Abell is a periodic comet in the Solar System. It was discovered by Robert G. Harrington and George O. Abell in 1955 on plates from the Palomar Sky Survey taken with the 49-inch Samuel Oschin telescope. It has been seen on every ap ...

                                               

37P/Forbes

37P/Forbes is a periodic comet in the Solar System. It was discovered on August 1, 1929 by Alex Rosebank ander F.I. Forbes of, South Africa. The comet nucleus is estimated to be 1.9 kilometers in diameter.

                                               

Sozin's Comet

Sozins Comet is the series finale of the American animated Nickelodeon television series Avatar: The Last Airbender. It was directed by Ethan Spaulding, Giancarlo Volpe, and Joaquim Dos Santos, and written by Michael Dante DiMartino, Bryan Koniet ...

                                               

Comet Swift–Tuttle

Comet Swift–Tuttle is a periodic comet with a current orbital period of 133 years. It fits the classical definition of a Halley-type comet with a period between 20 and 200 years. It was independently discovered by Lewis Swift on July 16, 1862 and ...

                                               

153P/Ikeya–Zhang

Comet Ikeya–Zhang is a comet discovered independently by two astronomers from Japan and China in 2002. On February 1, 2002, Chinese astronomer Zhang Daqing from Kaifeng discovered a new comet in the constellation Cetus, and reported it to the IAU ...

                                               

48P/Johnson

48P/Johnson is a periodic comet in the Solar System. The comet nucleus is estimated to be 5.7 kilometers in diameter by Lamy, Fernandez, and Weaver. David C. Jewitt and Scott S. Sheppard estimate the nucleus to have dimensions of 6.0 x 4.4 km.

                                               

35P/Herschel–Rigollet

35P/Herschel–Rigollet is a periodic comet with an orbital period of 155 years. It fits the classical definition of a Halley-type comet with. It was discovered by Caroline Herschel on 1788-12-21. Given that the comet takes 155 years to orbit the S ...

                                               

33P/Daniel

Comet Daniel is a periodic comet in the solar system discovered by Zaccheus Daniel on December 7, 1909, estimated as magnitude 9. Following its discovery, the returns for 1916, 1923, and 1930 were predicted but on each occasion it was not recover ...

                                               

Halley's Comet

Halleys Comet or Comet Halley, officially designated 1P/Halley, is a short-period comet visible from Earth every 75–76 years. Halley is the only known short-period comet that is regularly visible to the naked eye from Earth, and the only naked-ey ...

                                               

34D/Gale

Comet Gale is a periodic comet in the Solar System discovered by Walter Frederick Gale on June 7, 1927. The second apparition was calculated for 1938, but Gale failed to find it; however, it was recalculated by Leland E. Cunningham who later reco ...

                                               

43P/Wolf–Harrington

43P/Wolf–Harrington is a periodic comet discovered on December 22, 1924, by Max Wolf in Heidelberg, Germany. In 2019 it will pass within 0.065 AU of Jupiter, which will lift the perihelion point and increase the orbital period to 9 years. During ...

                                               

Comet West

Comet West, formally designated C/1975 V1, 1976 VI, and 1975n, was a comet described as one of the brightest objects to pass through the inner Solar System in 1976. It is often described as a "great comet."

                                               

40P/Vaisala

40P/Vaisala is a periodic comet that was discovered on February 8, 1939. Its orbit was determined on April 26, 1939. In 1994, the diameter of its nucleus was found to be 4.2 km, similar in size to that of Comet Encke.

                                               

49P/Arend–Rigaux

49P/Arend–Rigaux is a periodic comet in the Solar System. The comet nucleus is estimated to be 8.48 kilometers in diameter with a low albedo of 0.028. On 20 December 2058 the comet will pass 0.0867 AU 12.970.000 km; 8.060.000 mi from Mars.

                                               

47P/Ashbrook–Jackson

August 19, 1978 January 24, 1986 January 6, 2001 October 28, 2025 April 6, 1956 October 4, 1948 June 10, 2017 October 2, 1963 July 14, 1993 January 31, 2009 March 13, 1971

                                               

27P/Crommelin

Comet Crommelin, also known as Comet Pons-Coggia-Winnecke-Forbes, is a periodic comet with an orbital period of almost 28 years. It fits the classical definition of a Halley-type comet with. It is named after the British astronomer Andrew C. D. C ...

                                               

Comet Lovejoy

Comet Lovejoy may refer to: C/2011 W3 Lovejoy, a comet discovered in 2011, noted for its pass through the Suns corona C/2017 E4 Lovejoy, a comet discovered in 2017 by Terry Lovejoy C/2007 E2 Lovejoy, a comet discovered in March 2007 C/2014 Q2 Lov ...

                                               

44P/Reinmuth

44P/Reinmuth or Reinmuth 2 is a Jupiter-family comet that is greatly perturbed by the gas giant Jupiter. The diameter of this comet is estimated at 3.22 km and its absolute magnitude at 11.

                                               

38P/Stephan–Oterma

38P/Stephan–Oterma is a periodic comet with an orbital period of 38 years. It fits the classical definition of a Halley-type comet with. It was discovered in January 1867, by Jerome Eugene Coggia at Marseilles Observatory, France. 38P/Stephan–Ote ...

                                               

50P/Arend

Comet Arend or 50P/Arend is a periodic comet in the Solar System which was discovered on October 4, 1951. It was discovered by astronomer Sylvain Julien Victor Arend at the Royal Observatory of Belgium located in the municipality of Uccle. The co ...

                                               

Great Comet of 1811

The Great Comet of 1811, formally designated C/1811 F1, is a comet that was visible to the naked eye for around 260 days, a record it held until the appearance of Comet Hale–Bopp in 1997. In October 1811, at its brightest, and when it was 1.2 AU ...

                                               

Great Comet of 1843

The Great Comet of 1843, formally designated C/1843 D1 and 1843 I, was a long-period comet which became very bright in March 1843. It was discovered on February 5, 1843 and rapidly brightened to become a great comet. It was a member of the Kreutz ...

                                               

Great Comet of 1882

The Great Comet of 1882 formally designated C/1882 R1, 1882 II, and 1882b, was a comet which became very bright in September 1882. It was a member of the Kreutz Sungrazers, a family of comets which pass within 1 R ☉ of the Suns photosphere at per ...

                                               

Great Southern Comet of 1887

The Great Southern Comet of 1887, or C/1887 B1 using its International Astronomical Union designation, was a bright comet seen from the Southern Hemisphere during January 1887. Later calculations indicated it to be part of the Kreutz Sungrazing g ...

                                               

Great January Comet of 1910

The Great January Comet of 1910, formally designated C/1910 A1 and often referred to as the Daylight Comet, was a comet which appeared in January 1910. It was already visible to the naked eye when it was first noticed, and many people independent ...

                                               

Great comet

A great comet is a comet that becomes exceptionally bright. There is no official definition; often the term is attached to comets such as Halleys Comet, which are bright enough to be noticed by casual observers who are not looking for them, and b ...

                                               

Extinct comet

An extinct comet is a comet that has expelled most of its volatile ice and has little left to form a tail and coma. In a dormant comet, rather than being depleted, any remaining volatile components have been sealed beneath an inactive surface lay ...

                                               

Great Comet of 1823

The Great Comet of 1823, also designated C/1823 Y1 or Comet De Breaute-Pons, was a bright comet visible in the last month of 1823 and the first months of 1824. It was independently discovered by Nell de Breaute at Dieppe on December 29, by Jean-L ...

                                               

Holiday

A holiday is a day set aside by custom or by law on which normal activities, especially business or work including school, are suspended or reduced. Generally, holidays are intended to allow individuals to celebrate or commemorate an event or tra ...

                                               

Public holidays in Russia

The following is the list of official public holidays recognized by the Government of Russia. On these days, government offices, embassies and some shops, are closed. If the date of observance falls on a weekend, the following Monday will be a da ...

                                               

Feasts of Jesus Christ

Feasts of Jesus Christ are specific days of the year distinguished in the liturgical calendar as being significant days for the celebration of events in the life of Jesus Christ and his veneration, for the commemoration of his relics, signs and m ...

                                               

Scarlet Sails (tradition)

The Scarlet Sails is a celebration in St. Petersburg, Russia, the most massive and famous public event during the White Nights Festival every summer. The tradition is highly popular for its spectacular fireworks, numerous music concerts and a mas ...

                                               

National day

A national day is a designated date on which celebrations mark the nationhood of a nation or non-sovereign country. This nationhood can be symbolized by the date of independence, of becoming a republic or a significant date for a patron saint or ...

                                               

International Workers' Day

International Workers Day, also known as Workers Day, Labour Day in some countries and often referred to as May Day, is a celebration of labourers and the working classes that is promoted by the international labour movement which occurs every ye ...

                                               

Festival of the Sun

Festival of the Sun is an annual outdoor music festival held in December at the Sundowner Breakwall Tourist Park, Port Macquarie, New South Wales, Australia. It was first held in 2001 and first ticketed in 2005.

                                               

Line-crossing ceremony

The line-crossing ceremony is an initiation rite that commemorates a persons first crossing of the Equator. The tradition may have originated with ceremonies when passing headlands, and become a "folly" sanctioned as a boost to morale, or have be ...

                                               

Public holidays in Azerbaijan

Holidays in Azerbaijan were regulated in the Constitution of Azerbaijan SSR for the first time on 19 May 1921 by the Azeri leader Nariman Narimanov. Through the history non-working days have changed.

                                               

August

August is the eighth month of the year in the Julian and Gregorian calendars, and the fifth of seven months to have a length of 31 days. It was originally named Sextilis in Latin because it was the sixth month in the original ten-month Roman cale ...

                                               

April

April is the fourth month of the year in the Gregorian calendar, the fifth in the early Julian, the first of four months to have a length of 30 days, and the second of five months to have a length of less than 31 days. April is commonly associate ...

                                               

December

December is the twelfth and final month of the year in the Julian and Gregorian Calendars. It is also the last of seven months to have a length of 31 days. December got its name from the Latin word decem meaning ten because it was originally the ...

                                               

July

July is the seventh month of the year in the Julian and Gregorian Calendars and the fourth of seven months to have a length of 31 days. It was named by the Roman Senate in honour of Roman general Julius Caesar, it being the month of his birth. Pr ...

                                               

June

June is the sixth month of the year in the Julian and Gregorian calendars, the second of four months to have a length of 30 days, and the third of five months to have a length of less than 31 days. June contains the summer solstice in the Norther ...

                                               

March

March is the third month of the year and named after Mars in both the Julian and Gregorian calendars. It is the second of seven months to have a length of 31 days. In the Northern Hemisphere, the meteorological beginning of spring occurs on the f ...

                                               

May

May is the fifth month of the year in the Julian and Gregorian calendars and the third of seven months to have a length of 31 days. May is a month of spring in the Northern Hemisphere and autumn in the Southern Hemisphere. Therefore, May in the S ...

                                               

November

November is the eleventh month of the year in the Julian and Gregorian Calendars, the fourth and last of four months to have a length of 30 days and the fifth and last of five months to have a length of fewer than 31 days. November was the ninth ...

                                               

October

October is the tenth month of the year in the Julian and Gregorian Calendars and the sixth of seven months to have a length of 31 days. The eighth month in the old calendar of Romulus c. 750 BC, October retained its name after January and Februar ...

                                               

September

September is the ninth month of the year in the Julian and Gregorian calendars, the third of four months to have a length of 30 days, and the fourth of five months to have a length of less than 31 days. In the Northern Hemisphere September is the ...

                                               

February

February is the second month of the year in the Julian and Gregorian calendars, with 28 days in common years and 29 days in leap years, with the quadrennial 29th day being called the leap day. It is the first of five months to have fewer than 31 ...

                                               

January

January is the first month of the year in the Julian and Gregorian calendars and the first of seven months to have a length of 31 days. The first day of the month is known as New Years Day. It is, on average, the coldest month of the year within ...

                                               

August 11

3114 BC – The Mesoamerican Long Count calendar, used by several pre-Columbian Mesoamerican civilizations, notably the Maya, begins. 2006 – The oil tanker MT Solar 1 sinks off the coast of Guimaras and Negros Islands in the Philippines, causing th ...

                                               

August 12

August 12 is the 224th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 141 days remain until the end of the year. It is the peak of the Perseid meteor shower. It is also known as the "Glorious Twelfth" in the United Kingdom, as it marks the traditiona ...

                                               

August 14

1912 – U.S. Marines invade Nicaragua to support the U.S backed government installed there after Jose Santos Zelaya had resigned three years earlier. 1936 – Rainey Bethea is hanged in Owensboro, Kentucky in the last known public execution in the U ...

                                               

August 19

1960 – Sputnik program: Korabl-Sputnik 2: The Soviet Union launches the satellite with the dogs Belka and Strelka, 40 mice, two rats and a variety of plants. 1999 – In Belgrade, Yugoslavia, tens of thousands of Serbians rally to demand the resign ...

                                               

August 2

1873 – The Clay Street Hill Railroad begins operating the first cable car in San Franciscos famous cable car system. 1989 – Pakistan is re-admitted to the Commonwealth of Nations after having restored democracy for the first time since 1972. 1916 ...

                                               

August 26

2009 – Kidnapping victim Jaycee Dugard is discovered alive in California after being missing for over 18 years. 1071 – The Seljuq Turks defeat the Byzantine army at the Battle of Manzikert, and soon gain control of most of Anatolia. 1883 – The 18 ...

                                               

August 30

1813 – First Battle of Kulm: French forces are defeated by an Austrian-Prussian-Russian alliance. 1974 – A powerful bomb explodes at the Mitsubishi Heavy Industries headquarters in Marunouchi, Tokyo. Eight are killed, 378 are injured. Eight left- ...

                                               

August 6

1917 – World War I: Battle of Marașești between the Romanian and German armies begins. 1538 – Bogota, Colombia, is founded by Gonzalo Jimenez de Quesada. 1914 – World War I: Serbia declares war on Germany; Austria declares war on Russia. 1942 – Q ...

                                               

August 1

902 – Taormina, the last Byzantine stronghold in Sicily, is captured by the Aghlabids army, concluding the Muslim conquest of Sicily. 1966 – Charles Whitman kills 16 people at the University of Texas at Austin before being killed by the police. 1 ...

                                               

August 10

August 10 is the 222nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 143 days remain until the end of the year. The term the 10th of August is widely used by historians as a shorthand for the Storming of the Tuileries Palace on the 10th of August, 1 ...

                                               

August 13

1553 – Michael Servetus is arrested by John Calvin in Geneva, Switzerland as a heretic. 1650 – Colonel George Monck of the English Army forms Moncks Regiment of Foot, which will later become the Coldstream Guards. 1779 – American Revolutionary Wa ...

                                               

August 17

1945 – The novella Animal Farm by George Orwell is first published. 1723 – Ioan Giurgiu Patachi becomes Bishop of Fagaraș and is festively installed in his position at the St. Nicolas Cathedral in Fagaraș, after being formally confirmed earlier b ...

                                               

August 18

1304 – The Battle of Mons-en-Pevele is fought to a draw between the French army and the Flemish militias. 1989 – Leading presidential hopeful Luis Carlos Galan is assassinated near Bogota in Colombia. 2008 – President of Pakistan Pervez Musharraf ...

                                               

August 20

1920 – The National Football League is organized as the American Professional Football Conference in Canton, Ohio 1998 – The Supreme Court of Canada rules that Quebec cannot legally secede from Canada without the federal governments approval. 198 ...

                                               

August 21

1994 – Royal Air Maroc Flight 630 crashes in Douar Izounine, Morocco, killing all 44 people on board. 1791 – A Vodou ceremony, led by Dutty Boukman, turns into a violent slave rebellion, beginning the Haitian Revolution. 1680 – Pueblo Indians cap ...

                                               

August 22

1973 – The Congress of Chile votes in favour of a resolution condemning President Salvador Allendes government and demands that he resign or else be unseated through force and new elections. 1963 – X-15 Flight 91 reaches the highest altitude of t ...

                                               

August 23

August 23 is the 235th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 130 days remain until the end of the year. In ancient Astrology it is a cusp date between Virgo and Leo.

                                               

August 24

1690 – Job Charnock of the East India Company establishes a factory in Calcutta, an event formerly considered the founding of the city in 2003 the Calcutta High Court ruled that the citys foundation date is unknown. 1994 – Initial accord between ...

                                               

August 25

1835 – The first Great Moon Hoax article is published in The New York Sun, announcing the discovery of life and civilization on the Moon. 1961 – President Janio Quadros of Brazil resigns after just seven months in power, initiating a political cr ...

                                               

August 28

1955 – Black teenager Emmett Till is brutally murdered in Mississippi, galvanizing the nascent civil rights movement. 2003 – In "one of the most complicated and bizarre crimes in the annals of the FBI", Brian Wells dies after becoming involved in ...

                                               

August 29

1807 – British troops under Sir Arthur Wellesley defeat a Danish militia outside Copenhagen in the Battle of Koge. 1758 – The Treaty of Easton establishes the first American Indian reservation, at Indian Mills, New Jersey, for the Lenape. 1966 – ...

                                               

August 3

1959 – Portugals state police force PIDE fires upon striking workers in Bissau, Portuguese Guinea, killing over 50 people. 1903 – Macedonian rebels in Krusevo proclaim the Krusevo Republic, which exists only for ten days before Ottoman Turks lay ...

                                               

August 31

1999 – A LAPA Boeing 737-200 crashes during takeoff from Jorge Newbury Airport in Buenos Aires, killing 65, including two on the ground. 1886 – The 7.0 M w   Charleston earthquake affects southeastern South Carolina with a maximum Mercalli intens ...

                                               

August 4

1783 – Mount Asama erupts in Japan, killing about 1.400 people. The eruption causes a famine, which results in an additional 20.000 deaths. 1974 – A bomb explodes in the Italicus Express train at San Benedetto Val di Sambro, Italy, killing 12 peo ...

                                               

August 5

1971 – The first Pacific Islands Forum then known as the "South Pacific Forum" is held in Wellington, New Zealand, with the aim of enhancing cooperation between the independent countries of the Pacific Ocean. 1689 – Beaver Wars: Fifteen hundred I ...

                                               

August 7

August 7 is the 219th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 146 days remain until the end of the year. This day marks the approximate midpoint of summer in the Northern Hemisphere and of winter in the Southern Hemisphere starting the season ...

                                               

August 8

1647 – The Irish Confederate Wars and Wars of the Three Kingdoms: Battle of Dungans Hill: English Parliamentary forces defeat Irish forces. 1870 – The Republic of Ploiești, a failed Radical-Liberal rising against Domnitor Carol of Romania. 1945 – ...

                                               

August 9

1830 – Louis Philippe becomes the king of the French following abdication of Charles X. 1500 – Ottoman–Venetian War 1499–1503: The Ottomans capture Methoni, Messenia. 1610 – The First Anglo-Powhatan War begins in colonial Virginia. 1914 – Start o ...

                                               

April 15

1994 – Marrakesh Agreement relating to foundation of World Trade Organization is adopted. 1817 – Thomas Hopkins Gallaudet and Laurent Clerc founded the American School for the Deaf, the first American school for deaf students, in Hartford, Connec ...

                                               

April 11

1963 – Pope John XXIII issues Pacem in terris, the first encyclical addressed to all Christians instead of only Catholics, and which described the conditions for world peace in human terms. 1961 – The trial of Adolf Eichmann begins in Jerusalem. ...

                                               

April 14

1849 – Hungary declares itself independent of Austria with Lajos Kossuth as its leader. 1908 – Hauser Dam, a steel dam on the Missouri River in Montana, U.S., fails, sending a surge of water 25 to 30 feet 7.6 to 9.1 m high downstream. 1988 – In a ...

                                               

April 16

1818 – The United States Senate ratifies the Rush–Bagot Treaty, establishing the border with Canada. 2003 – The Treaty of Accession is signed in Athens admitting ten new member states to the European Union. 1858 – The Wernerian Natural History So ...

                                               

April 17

1961 – Bay of Pigs Invasion: A group of Cuban exiles financed and trained by the CIA lands at the Bay of Pigs in Cuba with the aim of ousting Fidel Castro. 1912 – Russian troops open fire on striking goldfield workers in northeast Siberia, killin ...

                                               

April 18

1946 – The International Court of Justice holds its inaugural meeting in The Hague, Netherlands. 1945 – Over 1.000 bombers attack the small island of Heligoland, Germany. 2013 – A suicide bombing in a Baghdad cafe kills 27 people and injures anot ...

                                               

April 19

797 – Empress Irene organizes a conspiracy against her son, the Byzantine emperor Constantine VI. He is deposed and blinded. Shortly after, Constantine dies of his wounds; Irene proclaims herself basileus. 1985 – Two hundred ATF and FBI agents la ...

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